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Getting together, putting together a group, etc. - carmine - May 21, 2008 02:21 PM

Do people still look to form groups to work on a project together? Which forum would I post that in.

I think everyone is very excited about making an MMORPG (and other things). Can it be done with a large enough group? I think everyone needs to have the same common goal.

Also... I'm curious about using Real Basic. There are some OpenGL plugins (and code for it). Enough to get people started...

I've also been checking out/buying graphics from http://www.3drt.com Most of us aren't graphics guys, so why not buy what you need Smile

-Carmine


Getting together, putting together a group, etc. - kodex - May 21, 2008 05:33 PM

Working with a group of programmers/artist online is a very difficult thing to do. It is very hard to find people who will be self motivated to provide quality work over extended time. It is possible to do but payroll would prove to be especially annoying there are different laws for every state and country pertaining to telecommuting workers and you would have to search heavily on how to pay employees.

Personally I don't think it would be possible to tackle a project as big as a MMORPG in a telecommuting environment. Your best bet would be to find people all interested in a local city (NYC should have plenty), then rent out some office space or use a basement and work on it there.

Edit: Taking a look at those models they seem to be low quality for the price they are asking, you would probably get more for your money by hiring a 3d artist student to do the stuff for you after school.


Getting together, putting together a group, etc. - AndyKorth - May 21, 2008 07:37 PM

In my personal experience, no one you work with online will pull through. I've solicited for help, and I've received offers for help, but no one every actually contributed anything. Any time I spent getting anyone up to speed on the project never yielded returns. I think getting help for a game is much harder than a normal application. Most people who offer to help on a game don't have nearly enough skills, motivation, or tenacity to contribute anything...

That's just my two cents though. If you want something done right, you have to do it yourself... or at least do most of it yourself before you'll get good help.

Since I feel like I should say something encouraging and constructive, Kodex had a good point. Find other local people, set up meetings in coffee shops or visit local game development clubs. Go check out this site and visit their local meetings: http://www.nycgames.org/blog/index.html


Getting together, putting together a group, etc. - IBethune - May 22, 2008 06:48 AM

If you do go down the online route, try out http://www.assembla.com, which gives you SVN & trac, along with a bunch of other project management tools and is free (at least for small projects).

I don't really use the collaborative bits of it, but it all looks good.

Cheers

- Iain


Getting together, putting together a group, etc. - Volte - May 22, 2008 09:46 AM

I'll try not to make assumptions about your current skill set, but as mentioned before MMORPGs are pretty massive endeavors. It takes months, sometimes years just to write a small game. Sure, you've got a valid point about setting a common goal and rallying with fellow coders to accomplish it. The problem is that when a new project is born, everybody has their own vision for it. That's where your problems begin. All your contributors will undoubtedly have dissenting views on how the game should be built, designed, and played.

The less complicated the game, the fewer dissenting opinions. For example; I'm not sure many people could argue about how pong should be played. Tetris probably can't be argued with a lot either, but add multiplayer into the equation, and bam, a multitude of ways to accomplish it. Yet, not only are these simple games, they are pre-existing.

If you can, like others have mentioned, design, storyboard, and build a basic prototype of the game you wish to make, thereby proving to yourself and to your potential contributors that the idea is palpable, your work is tangible, and your efforts are earnest; You'll find it much easier to attract help.

The point is, anybody who knows anything about game development has been burnt once or twice (and sometimes at their own doing) by visions of Grandeur. Don't think that just because you think you have a good idea for the next big thing, you can ride the wave of credit produced by your contributors. Contributors can have good ideas too, they don't need you for that Wink

I'd like to take the liberty of recommending similar views on such things. http://sol.gfxile.net/mmorpg.html, and our very own: http://www.idevgames.com/forum/showthread.php?t=9560&highlight=MMORPG


Getting together, putting together a group, etc. - AndyKorth - May 22, 2008 10:37 AM

Volte Wrote:The problem is that when a new project is born, everybody has their own vision for it. That's where your problems begin. All your contributors will undoubtedly have dissenting views on how the game should be built, designed, and played.

I've read articles that indicate this is why you see so few open source games succeed. The ones that do are typically clones of an existing game. This is because when you are creating a clone, it's clear to everyone involved what the game should entail.

I can't find the article I am thinking of, but wikipedia supports my point:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Open_source_games

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_open_source_games


Getting together, putting together a group, etc. - MattDiamond - May 22, 2008 11:06 AM

Some comments.

1. You'll tend to have more success recruiting people who have demonstrated some success in the past. Similarly, they'll want to see your "portfolio" as well.

2. You'll want something in hand (artwork, prototype, design docs..) The more real the project is, the more chance you'll get real interest and committment from someone.

3. If Andy is right that the people you sink time into will tend not to pay off, and I'm sure he is, it follows that you shouldn't sink much time into training people that you aren't sure of. Either they need to demonstrate worth somehow, or you follow an open source model, put your stuff out there, and if someone picks up the ball and runs with it, and starts contributing, fine.

4. If the above sounds tricky to pull off, and it should, then perhaps you'd be better off joining someone else's effort. You'll learn from it, and start to develop a portfolio and contacts.

Personally, I think you are better off at the start developing a small game by yourself.


Getting together, putting together a group, etc. - kodex - May 22, 2008 04:28 PM

There is nothing wrong with the two friends in the basement idea. It is how some great companies started like Panic. However trying to bring together a large team of people who don't know each other and working over the internet will be very difficult