Need suggestions for a game dev lecture series

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Posts: 683
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Post: #1
Starting next week, I will start giving a series of lectures on game development. What topics should I cover?

Current flyer is linked below, with references to CWRU-specific stuff.

PDF is here

Yes, I totally stole Cmd-R. Do you guys mind? I can change it. I do plan to point people to the site.

As a small demo, I wrote this game in 100 lines of Python. I think it would have won uDG. Also, I think that a "100-line Python game" contest would rock.

My web site - Games, music, Python stuff
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Apprentice
Posts: 5
Joined: 2009.02
Post: #2
Hi,

How can i get access to the lectures?

Are you going to post them online? it will be helpful.

Regards
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Moderator
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Post: #3
Due to the informal nature of our gatherings, I the best I can do is post PowerPoint slides if I make them.

What topics would you like to hear about?

My web site - Games, music, Python stuff
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Moderator
Posts: 624
Joined: 2007.09
Post: #4
Not exactly sure what you have in mind for this, but I would be interested in:
a) Animated sprites
b) Collision Detection
c) Artificial Intelligence

- Lincoln Green
http://www.binkworks.com/
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Moderator
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Post: #5
I know next to nothing about AI, and I try to avoid collision detection if I can avoid it. I do know about circle-circle collisions and bounding boxes, but that's about it.

What would I say about animated sprites? There are sprites. You animate them.

My web site - Games, music, Python stuff
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⌘-R in Chief
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Post: #6
diordna Wrote:I know next to nothing about AI, and I try to avoid collision detection if I can avoid it. I do know about circle-circle collisions and bounding boxes, but that's about it.

Which is all any beginner needs to learn. Beyond that, use Chipmunk Wink



Quote:What would I say about animated sprites? There are sprites. You animate them.

Say that and show em how. Most things are obvious once you know about them, but if you've never done it before, you don't know how everyone else does it. Just being told the obvious is sometimes very helpful.
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Post: #7
FreakSoftware Wrote:Say that and show em how. Most things are obvious once you know about them, but if you've never done it before, you don't know how everyone else does it. Just being told the obvious is sometimes very helpful.
Animations in Pyglet are all handled automatically, even more so with the new resource handling library I just released. I guess I could just cover different kinds of animations, how to use them, how to switch, etc, but it's all very basic. Most of the people I'll be speaking to have been taking a crappy game dev course since January and will already know the basics.

One thing I will definitely talk about is how to use physics libraries rather than implementing your own physics. That's the really important part.

My web site - Games, music, Python stuff
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⌘-R in Chief
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Post: #8
Hmm. Well if you're more or less just teaching them how to use Pyglet, then I'd just walk through the entire process of creating an entire game, rather than talk about the underlying principles.

"Here's how you'd do it on your own, but ignore that since you can use this one line of code with Pyglet" Smile
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Post: #9
Well, I hope to discuss concepts in general and just use Pyglet for the examples. As I said before, these guys are all familiar with programming, and most of them have been taking a course for a while, so most of them can already make Asteroids. I want to use Pyglet as a starting point and then use it to go other places. Since the university course is Windows-specific, I want to provide a cross-platform option.

If you look at the PDF I linked in the first post, it lists things like "finding a team" and "structuring large projects." This is more about how to approach game development rather than how to implement specific parts, which intelligent people can figure out for themselves anyway. However, I do think it is a good idea to cover certain technical topics like OpenGL.

My web site - Games, music, Python stuff
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