At what age did you get into programming

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Post: #31
_ibd_ Wrote:Wow, I already don't remember. Rasp Probably around 13 with TNTbasic. Then switched to BlitzMax, then to C++.

Wow, exactly as me, just 8 years younger Wink

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Post: #32
igame3d Wrote:Do people call you C3P0?

Would it be wrong if I said that I consider C3P0 the Jar Jar of the original trilogy? Sneaky

Actually 20 isn't that much if you consider the syntax similarities between many languages so, once you learn one language, there are a few more in the same family that take almost no effort to learn. The main issue isn't so much the languages themselves but the (sometimes huge) frameworks and libraries, as well as the environment they are designed for.
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Post: #33
monteboyd Wrote:Yeah on the C64 it was brilliant. The Amiga version was really slow and bad unfortunately. Apologies if anyone here was actually involved in the Amiga version!

Is that a fact? I never saw it on the C64, only had it on Amiga it was a blast.
The worste part was all art assets had to be created in the program, with its click the bit interface.
I made zombie games, graveyards, things coming out the ground etc.
Kind of got ridiculous when giant eyeballs shot at you.

I have a file somewhere with the details of SEUCK, its various screens etc.
Was going to try to make one, but honestly I won't play more than 30 seconds of a scrolling shoot 'em up before being bored mindless.

Played way too much Xevious at the beer stinking "Rocky's" bar and on the Atari 7800
Our challenge was to get through the entire Guns and Roses "Lies" album without being killed once.

Doesn't Will Hogben's Wingnuts have a level editor, should fit the bill.

I remember Adventure Construction Kit for C64, vaguely.
Here's a Blog post about it, with a bonus IG-88 assasin droid dressed as a wizard.

Friend of your's PowerMacX?

PowerMacX Wrote:Would it be wrong if I said that I consider C3P0 the Jar Jar of the original trilogy? Sneaky
I doubt there are many C3P0 fans in the world, except maybe for what he's capable off. Just imagine playing a casette file of some old Basic program from an obsolete computer and C3P0 being able to read back the code from the beeps and bloops, and then give you valid JavaScript or ActionScript to make it run in a webpage or C and OpenGL ES to run on a iPhone..woohoo!

Well I guess you can do that ;-)
You even have a machine name for a forum handle.
Very suspicious...

PowerMacX Wrote:The main issue isn't so much the languages themselves but the (sometimes huge) frameworks and libraries, as well as the environment they are designed for.

Yup moving from one BASIC to another drove me nuts as a kid: "What do you mean this doesn't work?!? Its BASIC its suppose to work!"
and "Damn wish I had sprites, oh well poke 14274,126, print chr$(20)"
and then in 1989 when I hadn't used a computer for programming since 1983 experiencing AmigaBASIC: "WTF, no line numbers and no manual?!?"
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Post: #34
While we're here, I will say that I would be willing to work on a generalized SEUCK in Python. It wouldn't be too hard. Gw0rp's level editor could be rejiggered.

My web site - Games, music, Python stuff
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Post: #35
Make a WIP thread (might be an old thread about it), and see where it goes.
Here's my old (2004) SEUCK research , a bunch of screenshots of the Amiga interface.
Plus a little application where i made some notes about what the screens are.

Just for reference and nostalgia, an Amiga game UI in 2009 is wrong in too many ways.
Even Dungeon Master suffers from not being Mac like.

Speaking of Dungeon Master, anyone up to bring it to Xcode?
Old mac version from 2004 is codewarrior project and dead on 10.5 Intel.
Here's some linkages General OS X version forum posts
Problem posts
Where to get the download

Make it an MMO while you're at it, same for SEUCK.yeah!. Rasp
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Post: #36
PowerMacX Wrote:Would it be wrong if I said that I consider C3P0 the Jar Jar of the original trilogy? Sneaky

Thanks man.... Now I'm never going to look at him the same away again... Cry





Quote:Actually 20 isn't that much if you consider the syntax similarities between many languages so, once you learn one language, there are a few more in the same family that take almost no effort to learn. The main issue isn't so much the languages themselves but the (sometimes huge) frameworks and libraries, as well as the environment they are designed for.

Agreed. Once you learn programming on any simple language with garbage collection and no pointers (REALbasic, Ruby, C#, etc) then after learning C, you can pretty pick up any other language in day. Getting the APIs sorted out though takes a looong time.
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Post: #37
I started a bit my senior year at high school when I got RealBasic for Christmas. Unfortunately, I was hampered by bugs and other issues with the environment, so shortly decided to wait until I started university the following year to learn real programming. We mainly did Java in school, but I taught myself C, C++, and ObjectiveC using various books. I've since graduated and work at a games/simulation company as my day job. So at about 17, or 5 years ago, for me.
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Post: #38
I started in high school learning PASCAL and C on a Mac Classic, the kind with no HD and two floppy drives, one external. I'm old enough that I grew up in a house without a computer, and never even knew about the internet until I got to college.

So now I'm 31, and I feel old seeing how young a lot of folks here are.

EDIT: Sorta funny story. When I was 14 or 15, I knew I wanted to learn to program, but since my family didn't have a computer I went to a yard sale and bought an ancient commodore for $5. The kind where programs came on tape, not disk. THe machine sort of worked.

So, it came with a FANTASTIC spiral bound book on the fundamentals of programming, starting with binary arithmetic and up from there to BASIC. And I read that book cover to cover on a family camping vacation to Colorado. I spent a week staying up late in my tent reading that book by flashlight.

And then, when I sat down to start hacking, the damn Commodore proved not to work at all. But I still have that book, somewhere. I miss the old days where computers came with programming manuals that explained what the computer was actually doing. Now days we're lucky if a computer comes with a picture of where the plugs go. What a loss!
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DoG
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Post: #39
Funny, I did start with PEEK and POKE and 20 GOTO 10 on a Commodore 64, which my dad bought used, must've been around the time the Amigas got popular. It did come with a floppy drive, though, not tapes. I still got The Book, and the machine, too, in a box somewhere. I can't even remember what language the manual was in. I'll have to find out next time I go digging in the basement.

I can't really remember why I had started programming, or why I kept at it. I guess on the C64 it was just really accessible, but how I made the jump to C, that I can't remember.

Oh, and stop whining about the old days. Nowadays computers come with the internet instead of a thick manual, and I believe anybody capable of understanding how to move the image of a hot air balloon accross the screen in C64 BASIC, can also figure out how write a program on a PC, if willing to do so. Though, it's still madness.

The PC of today may be a lot more complex than what it was 20 years ago, but you also have other great stuff, like the Lego Mindstorms kits, which make getting into programming even easier, and definitely even more fun, as, let's face it, who wouldn't wanna build their personal killer robot.

Oh man, there's a lot more <rant> potential in this topic than I first thought Wink
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Post: #40
It is interesting to see the differences in generations. One group started with machines that you turned on, and you were ready to type in BASIC. While these days, we have IDEs, SDKs and so much more to deal with.

My history: http://www.idevgames.com/objective-cc/fr...i-to-apple

Quote:The Computer Programme was by the BBC
I have really found memories of that show as it was shown on public television in the US.

Quote:Shoot 'Em Up Constuction Kit
I loved it as well. I spent so much time with it. I recall giving a demo of SEUCK at our Amiga user group (for anyone under 30 think of FaceBook, but live). I sold about 9 copies for the computer store that we had our meetings in on that day. lol

Carlos A. Camacho,
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Post: #41
Interesting thread. Its good to know people in the community. I could actually list several ages when I got into programming. My dad was an early computer scientist, so I was exposed to computers at a very young age. (my folks still have stacks of punchcards in their attic). We had an apple II, and the first thing that really got me into programming was this game:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robot_Odyssey

I was about 10.

I lost interest in High School, and got into theatre set design instead. Perhaps it was the whole rebel against the parents thing. My dad was a geek, and I didn't want to be like him. Rasp Jokes on me.

I got back into programming again in college at about 18, and ended up double majoring in computer science and theater. I must have had the most boring senior class though. We had to do group coding projects and none of my classmates wanted to make games. They all wanted to code boring things like spreadsheets and such.

I got into motion graphics and animation after college. For about 10 years, I didn't do much coding at all beyond the occasional After Effects script. Eventually I ended up where I work now creating graphics at a museum multimedia company. A couple years ago at age 31, I was asked to update an old program that my company had done before my time that was created in Director. I really got into the software, and have done several increasingly complicated museum projects with it in the years since.

Ok, gotta get back to Constellation...
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Post: #42
I was interesting in making computer programs, and especially games, ever since I came into contact with video game consoles. I began coding with HyperCard when I was 11 years old. I still think scripting is a great way for many programmers to learn, since it gets all the complicated stuff out of the way and just teaches you some concepts about variables, functions, messaging, etc. Performa 6115CD all the way.

I got the book Learn C++ in 21 Days not long after I started with HyperCard, though, since I thought C++ was a "real" language... and it was, comparatively, but I still continued making games in HyperCard for the next 9 years. I did, however, take courses on C and Java, and was employed doing programming in PHP and C# off and on throughout those years, so I was not letting my knowledge sit unused nor stick with one language.

Now I am doing either web technologies (PHP, mySQL, javascript) or, more likely, Objective C with XCode. I'm getting pretty comfortable with Obj C, Cocoa, and parts of the Mac OS X APIs thanks to iPhone development... and getting paid for my trouble as a side job, too!

KB Productions, Car Care for iPhone/iPod Touch
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All too often, art is simply the loss of practicality.
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Post: #43
Najdorf Wrote:Wow, exactly as me, just 8 years younger Wink

Also TNT BASIC, at around age 14. Still in the BlitzMax stage though Rolleyes

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Post: #44
Shunter Wrote:Also TNT BASIC, at around age 14. Still in the BlitzMax stage though Rolleyes

Nothing wrong with blitzmax, works well for most 2d games and is a very, very productive tool (everything you need is there, simple and nicely integrated, working as you expect it to).

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