Could you explain programming please?

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Post: #1
http://thedailywtf.com/Articles/Could-Yo...lease.aspx

I'm sure more than a few of you will enjoy this one.
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Well, I have to admit that this is the way I got started with programming (although I didn't have any fancy book, didn't call anyone and was eight years at the time). Nice story.
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Cochrane Wrote:Well, I have to admit that this is the way I got started with programming (although I didn't have any fancy book, didn't call anyone and was eight years at the time). Nice story.

I remember back around the year 1999 I emailed Brian Greenstone (of Pangea software) and asked him how I could start to learn to program. I was 12 years old back then, and though I had some Hypercard experience, my inquiry was probably pretty inane like the ones in the article. He was nice though and recommended learning C++. I actually didn't learn C till much later because at the time I had no patience what-so-ever for manuals, and preferred HyperTalk, which could be figured out very easily by looking at other's code.
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Quote:He created a text file with the words "Morph the screen into something cool" and couldn't figure out how to run it...

Well I see the problem! He SHOULD have written "Morph the screen into something cool;" - you need a semi-colon at the end of the command. :-)

LOL

But seriously, I remember now. When I began programming I did expect everything to already have been coded. Like: putImageOnBigSquareInCenterOfWindow(~/mypng.png); moveSquareBackAndForthWhenLeftAndRightKeysPressed();

Of course I quickly realised this was not the case. But I think this is the general perception of people who have never seen a line of code, I mean programming a 3D game can't possibly involve years of learning and tens or hundreds of thousands of lines of code or no one would do it right?

The amount of work involved in making and releasing even the most basic commercial quality 3D game is comparable to building a house. And I'm not just talking about putting a few bricks together, I'm talking about starting from an empty plot of land, designing the blueprints, ordering the materials, adding the plumbing, the interior design.... the lot.

And in order to do it, you have to either learn the skills needed in all of the many areas involved, or get a big team to do it for you.

And halo 3 isn't a house, it's the Burj Al Arab.

I'm glad that we tend to underestimate these complexities to such an extreme though. For those of us who have gone far enough to see the truth it makes for good entertainment, and makes us feel smart Wink

Chopper, iSight Screensavers, DuckDuckDuck: http://majicjungle.com
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Post: #5
reubert Wrote:LOL

But seriously, I remember now. When I began programming I did expect everything to already have been coded. Like: putImageOnBigSquareInCenterOfWindow(~/mypng.png); moveSquareBackAndForthWhenLeftAndRightKeysPressed();

Didn't we all? I still expect it to be like that. loadInCool3DModel. driveAroundTrack. shootCoolGun.
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reubert Wrote:The amount of work involved in making and releasing even the most basic commercial quality 3D game is comparable to building a house.
My family has been in the construction business for generations. I've been screwing around with hobby quality 3D game development for maybe 6 years, and I think building a house is much easier. Wink
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DesertPenguin
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When I was learning to program, back in early 80's, they used to print the program listings in computer magazines. (This was when floppy disks were 5 1/4" and too expensive to include with the magazine)

As a kid, my friends and I would literally spend several hours typing in several hundred lines of Basic code just to see a lame ascii game. And there would always be tons of typos and syntax errors.

Ahhh, memories....those were the good times .... *sniff* *sniff*
;-)
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DoG
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Was I the only one who started programming by looking at 20 GOTO 10 style stuff on a C64? Hand coded sprites? Kids these days... GET OFF MY DAMN LAWN! Rasp
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DesertPenguin Wrote:When I was learning to program, back in early 80's, they used to print the program listings in computer magazines. (This was when floppy disks were 5 1/4" and too expensive to include with the magazine)

As a kid, my friends and I would literally spend several hours typing in several hundred lines of Basic code just to see a lame ascii game. And there would always be tons of typos and syntax errors.

Ahhh, memories....those were the good times .... *sniff* *sniff*
;-)

*Wipes eyes". "Why, it's just like in the video games! *Sob* *sniffle* *breaks down and starts crying uncontrollably*."
RaspRasp
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I've hand-coded a sprite for an animated knight. That makes me cool.
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DoG Wrote:Was I the only one who started programming by looking at 20 GOTO 10 style stuff on a C64?

No. There are at least a few of us around here who did that. I did it on the CoCo1 (which I still have, and still works!). Magazine BASIC programming was fun on Saturday mornings! I'll never forget when I got a vertical scrolling star field to work.
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Post: #12
heh—I got gradually acllimated. HTML, then C, (backed out quickly), then java (wrote my first program—printed 1-100 with a line return after every multiple of ten.) Then I dabbled in tntbasic, and went back to c.

It's not magic, it's Ruby.
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I dabbled in REALbasic, and even got so far as programming a ball/paddle game, then moved on to HTML as I upgraded from a Powermac 7100 to an iMac g3, and I only had version 4.5 (Which only supports carbon builds), tried to learn Java but gave up in favor of Objective-C. Pretty long history for a guy still trying to program FlipSquare.Rolleyes
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