Objective C and Xcode for a former SuperCard user

wal9000
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Post: #1
Just a bit of background info: I started with basic program in HyperCard when I was pretty young. I don't really remember when, but it was on OS 7 before I was in middle school, so my best guess is that I was about 8. When OS X was released I got a copy of SuperCard and continued to teach myself, but gradually lost interest because I was spending more time on school and gaming. In the mean time I've managed to teach myself HTML, CSS, and a fair amount of AppleScript, but I'd like to move on to some "real" programming.

I think a good place for me to start one I know what I'm doing would be a simple game like Tic-Tac-Toe or that "jump the pegs over each other until only one is left" game (does that have a name?) and also play around with some non-game software like a basic calculator, but I generally learn best when I can get an idea and teach myself to do it instead of copying code from a book and trying to understand how it works. That's how I learned SuperTalk and AppleScript, and it's what I'd like to try to do here.

What I'm looking for now are programming resources for beginners in Objective C and Xcode that explain basic Xcode functionality like how to attach code to a button or other trigger (such as a mouseover) and an introduction in to Objective C syntax without spending too much time on explanations of basic programming concepts like loops, if statements, and variables. I'd also like to find a list of some basic commands and how they are used to give myself a starting point to work off of. Does such a resource exist?

Thanks,
Will
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Sage
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Post: #2
You are probably best to do it as a java applet.

Sir, e^iπ + 1 = 0, hence God exists; reply!
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Post: #3
unknown Wrote:You are probably best to do it as a java applet.

Java applet's are dead. Don't use them. Use Flash if you have to.

wal9000 Wrote:Does such a resource exist?

There are 2 actually:

http://developer.apple.com

and

http://www.google.com

"When you dream, there are no rules..."
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wal9000
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Post: #4
Taxxodium Wrote:Java applet's are dead. Don't use them. Use Flash if you have to.



There are 2 actually:

http://developer.apple.com

and

http://www.google.com

I did try google before posting. Most of what I got was "program basics for idiots using some obscure language or compiler I'm not interested in learning" or tutorials in more advanced topics. No luck in finding a basic explanation of how to navigate XCode and what all of the interface elements mean. It seems to be a significant interface departure from all of their other software, and while I'm sure it makes good sense when you understand it, it's rather difficult to grasp at first. Imagine my surprise when I went to the preferences and saw "Cancel" "OK" and "Apply" buttons. It just doesn't work the way I'd expect it to.

Developer.apple.com does have a getting started section, which I didn't see last time I was there (I probably missed it, since it's a lot of content to have been created recently). The redesigned site is much less menacing looking that it used to be. I've got to run off to the doctor's now (I woke up with pinkeye this morning) but I'll check it out when I get back.

I also checked back on CocoaDevCentral and found their learn cocoa 2 tutorial. Last time I was there all they had was the first one, which was pretty much "Draw a text box in interface builder and compile it! Good work, you made a program!" That should answer a few of my questions.
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Sage
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Post: #5
Taxxodium Wrote:Java applet's are dead. Don't use them. Use Flash if you have to.

wrong, java applets are very much not dead and its an excellent way to learn to do this sort of thing.

Sir, e^iπ + 1 = 0, hence God exists; reply!
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Post: #6
Xcode can be rather frustrating to use at times, so don't think you're crazy if it's giving you grief -- it's definitely not an iApp!

As far as learning resources, they're scattered in little bits and pieces all over the place. You might try o'reilly's mac dev center for Cocoa related tutorials.

You might also try http://www.cocoalab.com/developer.php

BTW, I personally dislike java applets.
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Member
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Post: #7
I suggest going through the tutorials at http://www.cocoadevcentral.com. Scott Stevenson does a great job of integrating graphics, code, and explanations. The Learn Cocoa tutorial runs you through the basics of XCode.
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Post: #8
http://processing.org/

This makes making java applets easy. It's java, but with an extremely powerful api to go along with it. It can also do other things (opengl, hardware!)

It's not magic, it's Ruby.
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Post: #9
unknown Wrote:wrong, java applets are very much not dead and its an excellent way to learn to do this sort of thing.

The <applet> tag has been deprecated since HTML 4.01. In other worlds, Applets are dead.

Source: http://www.w3schools.com/tags/tag_applet.asp

"When you dream, there are no rules..."
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Luminary
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Post: #10
replaced by <object> I believe...
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Sage
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Post: #11
Taxxodium Wrote:The <applet> tag has been deprecated since HTML 4.01. In other worlds, Applets are dead.

Source: http://www.w3schools.com/tags/tag_applet.asp

no still valid in appletviewer, you are confusing the applet tag with java applets themselves.

Sir, e^iπ + 1 = 0, hence God exists; reply!
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Post: #12
Internet moves fast but this is what I recall...

I'd stay away from Java Applets. Though, I think Java Web Start is interesting -- where you download a signed jar file if I recall.

Considering the web is cross platform, you'll find out the IE on windows is going to be set to microsoft's Java VM by default which is going to be an older less capable version of Java. Now you have to play a game of versions. Where as the mac, is going to have the newer VM and everything is going to be chipper.

Moreover, if its a slow computer the user is going to have to wait a while for the entire VM to load. This is not as bad of a problem today given how fast computers have become. But you never know who is going to view the page.

If its an enterprise environment, where the browser is well defined by an IT department then it might be reasonable to use a java applet.

I'd consider flash. Adobe is very proactive. Versus a Microsoft and Java...

Just my 2 cents...
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wal9000
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Post: #13
macnib Wrote:Internet moves fast but this is what I recall...

I'd stay away from Java Applets. Though, I think Java Web Start is interesting -- where you download a signed jar file if I recall.

Considering the web is cross platform, you'll find out the IE on windows is going to be set to microsoft's Java VM by default which is going to be an older less capable version of Java. Now you have to play a game of versions. Where as the mac, is going to have the newer VM and everything is going to be chipper.

Moreover, if its a slow computer the user is going to have to wait a while for the entire VM to load. This is not as bad of a problem today given how fast computers have become. But you never know who is going to view the page.

If its an enterprise environment, where the browser is well defined by an IT department then it might be reasonable to use a java applet.

I'd consider flash. Adobe is very proactive. Versus a Microsoft and Java...

Just my 2 cents...

Even the student version of Flash is more money than I have to spare right now, with college (and lots of textbooks) just around the corner. I do have Macromedia Studio MX 2k4, which includes it, but based on my experiences with Fireworks under rosetta I'd like to avoid that path.

Actionscript does look interesting though, and flash is something I'd like to try out at some point because of the reliable cross platform performance. I'll put that one on my to do list and try to move forward in Xcode at the moment. I'll hopefully have enough time tonight to get going on the cocoadevcentral tutorial.

Thanks for the replies!
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Post: #14
wal9000 Wrote:Actionscript does look interesting though, and flash is something I'd like to try out at some point because of the reliable cross platform performance.

You'd be (un)pleasantly surprised...

"When you dream, there are no rules..."
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Post: #15
macnib Wrote:Considering the web is cross platform, you'll find out the IE on windows is going to be set to microsoft's Java VM by default which is going to be an older less capable version of Java. Now you have to play a game of versions. Where as the mac, is going to have the newer VM and everything is going to be chipper.
Aren't virtual machines always maintained* by the OS company? So of course it'd be Microsoft's Java VM. And Mac OS X certainly doesn't have the newest VM. Apple hasn't released Java 6 yet and it's been out for... months? And it probably won't be out until Leopard so we still have months to wait. Windows really does have Mac beat on Java.

* yeah, I guess there's the open source initiative but I'm willing to bet very few consumers actually use it.
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