Porting examples from an introductory 3D book

crazy_ut2k4
Unregistered
 
Post: #1
I'm trying to find a book that would take me through the basics of 3D, starting well before libraries like OpenGL kick in & covering the math behind all of the stuff that the library can take care of for me. I guess I'm mostly just curious to find out the "why" rather than the "how" -- or, to be more precise, rather than the "how it's done today". Unfortunately for me, most of the new books seem to be dedicated introductions to DirectX, both requiring it & counting on it to paper over any of the complexity. Unfortunately for me, I'm not even close to beginning to be much of a math guru, so this book would have to start pretty low on the difficulty level before ramping up.

One such book from several years back that I thought about getting based on reviews on Amazon was Andre LaMothe's "Tricks of the 3d Game Programming Gurus: Advanced 3d Graphics and Rasterization" ( http://search.half.ebay.com/ws/web/HalfS...0672318350 http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/custome...0672318350 ) because people said that it started with the basic math and worked up from there. However, this is even apparently the second of a two-part DirectX lovefest that I wasn't sure I wanted to get into. I really don't even want to start with OpenGL - I want to understand what OpenGL does for me rather than treating it as the magical black box.

I guess in summary my question is in two parts: is there a good 3D book that starts on a low level and still gets to the details & if this book does not do the work needed to be platform agnostic, how much effort would be required on my part to get it rolling on the Mac?

Thanks in advance for any pointers you are able to provide.
Quote this message in a reply
Moderator
Posts: 3,570
Joined: 2003.06
Post: #2
crazy_ut2k4 Wrote:One such book from several years back that I thought about getting based on reviews on Amazon was Andre LaMothe's "Tricks of the 3d Game Programming Gurus: Advanced 3d Graphics and Rasterization"
As far as I've ever discovered, that book is practically about all there is available on that very particular subject. It isn't easy to approach any way you look at it. Tricks of the 3d Gurus is NOT a DirectX book, but LaMothe is clearly an advocate. It is indeed a book about how to do real-time 3D completely in software, on any platform really. I have read and followed at least half of it myself and can testify that it won't hold your hand through all of it, but if you really want to bust your nuts on the underlying bolts of what modern real-time 3D software is all about (as in < Quake3), then that's yer book. The subject is so complex, and takes so much work to truly get anything done with that porting the book's simple `wrapper' library to Mac should be considered a prerequisite. Sorry to be so harsh about it, but if you can't hack porting a couple thousand lines of (relatively) basic graphic code to another platform, then you likely cannot handle the other >60kloc of intense stuff that follows. Don't get me wrong, you'll learn what you want to out of that book, [****edit****] even by just reading it without bothering to port any code [****/edit****], but it ain't for the lazy by any stretch of the imagination. Real-time 3D done in software is *hard*!

Alternatively, one book that seems to cover a lot of the basics behind 3D math in a more digestible, generic manner, is 3D Math Primer for Graphics and Game Development (the code's all C++ though if that matters to you). I have other books I like too (like Real-Time Rendering, etc.), but that one is perhaps the only one I would recommend in terms of being relatively `easy to read' I suppose.
Quote this message in a reply
crazy_ut2k4
Unregistered
 
Post: #3
Thanks for your input... it sounds like it's the book for me.
Quote this message in a reply
Member
Posts: 185
Joined: 2005.02
Post: #4
AnotherJake Wrote:I have other books I like too (like Real-Time Rendering, etc.)

Oh, I was looking at getting Real-Time Rendering. What's your opinion on it?
Quote this message in a reply
Moderator
Posts: 3,570
Joined: 2003.06
Post: #5
ferum Wrote:Oh, I was looking at getting Real-Time Rendering. What's your opinion on it?
I have the first edition. It has come in handy from time to time to understand certain concepts. It is *not* an easy read. In fact, I just use it as a reference. I personally like it, but I can't recommend it without first warning that it's mostly real low-level stuff, often described with a lot of math (which is often over my head because I'm not good at math). There's no code in this book, just words and math. Sometimes concepts are just kind of skimmed over and sometimes they're dealt with in-depth. Some concepts are missing, others are outdated. I don't know if the missing ones are covered in the second edition or not, so I can't speak to that. They did manage to pack a lot of stuff in as few pages as they have however. I would highly recommend getting your hands on a copy to peruse before you buy if you can. Maybe there's a `look inside' at Amazon.
Quote this message in a reply
Post Reply 

Possibly Related Threads...
Thread: Author Replies: Views: Last Post
  Physics Examples/Help With Differentials Nick 1 2,035 Jan 14, 2006 05:29 PM
Last Post: Josh
  NSAffineTransform Examples dancedrummer 2 4,686 Jul 1, 2005 09:34 PM
Last Post: dancedrummer