How to be a Nintendo developer?

⌘-R in Chief
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Post: #1
Forgive my ignorance, but what does it take to do DS development?
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Max
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Posts: 84
Joined: 2003.03
Post: #2
Malarkey Wrote:However, from a developer stand point, I really, really, really wish Nintendo didn't muck with the brightness and contrast so much since all the games out there are optimized for the regular DS displays. Just my $0.02.
What exactly do you do to optimize your games for the regular DS screen?

Freelance video game artist and video game compliance tester at Enzyme Testing Labs.
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Sage
Posts: 1,066
Joined: 2004.07
Post: #3
I thought the Lite was the same price everywhere. Here in Michigan, we're launching the DS Lite at $130 USD, same as the regular DS.

For development here are some links:
http://www.dsdev.org/
http://www.double.co.nz/nintendo_ds/
To get the data to your DS, you either need PassMe or WifiMe.
WifiMe
PassMe
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Member
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Post: #4
@FreakSoftware: Not to sound flippant, but for me, the boss found a publisher (Bethesda Software) willing to take a chance on us making a DS and PSP game when we had very little console experience. So basically, that was our foot in the door with Nintendo to do DS development.

@Max: From what I can tell, trial and error. No seriously, the artist makes the assets, I drop them in the game, and then they look at it and see how the colors look and then tweak it from there until it looks good.

The brains and fingers behind Malarkey Software (plus caretaker of the world's two brattiest felines).
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Moderator
Posts: 102
Joined: 2003.07
Post: #5
I've been talking a lot in #dsdev on EFNet and they say the best mac homebrew solution would be to buy the following things...
1. SuperCard miniSD (basically a GBA cart with an SD card slot)
2. about a 1GB SD card and a USB reader (DS cards have 32bit address space Grin)
3. and a Max Media Launcher card (basically tells the DS to begin execution at the GBA slot)
all in all it'll probably cost you about 100 USD. give or take. the most expensive item is the SuperCard which I just bought for 54 USD. just google for the rest of the stuff. if you want to do DS homebrew, this stuff all works for the DS Lite and the Firmware version 4. if you have earlier than that you can buy a PassMe but if you have a newer DS... no dice

hope that helps!

-CarbonX
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⌘-R in Chief
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Post: #6
@Malarkey I meant tools, languages, hardware....
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Sage
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Joined: 2002.09
Post: #7
Sure, but I would be surprised if the old one didn't drop $30 or so in price.

Scott Lembcke - Howling Moon Software
Author of Chipmunk Physics - A fast and simple rigid body physics library in C.
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Member
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Post: #8
FreakSoftware Wrote:@Malarkey I meant tools, languages, hardware....

I basically have a box about the size of a large hardcover novel sitting on my desk that has a DS connected to it that I can upload binaries into it. We use a custom version of Codewarrior provided by Nintendo and C++ for the code. The artists have their own tools for doing 2D and 3D stuff which, again, are provided by Nintendo. If I recall, there's a lot of setup involved in getting the ball rolling by getting art to actually display on the screen. But once you get past that point, it's not so bad. Nintendo's stuff is very well documented and easy to use.

The brains and fingers behind Malarkey Software (plus caretaker of the world's two brattiest felines).
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⌘-R in Chief
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Post: #9
So you have to be a licensed developer to get this stuff too, I imagine? What does that take? Can you just be anybody or do you have to "prove" yourself? Or do you just pay them what they want? Smile
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Max
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Post: #10
Malarkey Wrote:The artists have their own tools for doing 2D and 3D stuff which, again, are provided by Nintendo. If I recall, there's a lot of setup involved in getting the ball rolling by getting art to actually display on the screen.
That's odd. I used Photoshop for my GBA/DS video game. No special Nintendo tools. Since the programmer was in the UK, he had to email me screenshots as well as captured video of the video game. Not exactly the best workflow... Rasp

Freelance video game artist and video game compliance tester at Enzyme Testing Labs.
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Member
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Post: #11
Max Wrote:That's odd. I used Photoshop for my GBA/DS video game. No special Nintendo tools. Since the programmer was in the UK, he had to email me screenshots as well as captured video of the video game. Not exactly the best workflow... Rasp

The 2D artist on the project does use Photoshop to make all the graphics but then uses tools from Nintendo to convert them into a proprietary compressed format.

The brains and fingers behind Malarkey Software (plus caretaker of the world's two brattiest felines).
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