How old were you when you got your first computer? What kind of computer?

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Post: #1
and I mean a REAL computer... not a Talking Computron Wink

I was 9 when I got mine. It was an Apple IIc clone called the Laser 128. It's also the machine I first learned to program on. As soon as it finished booting, you were presented with a command line where you could start entering lines of BASIC. Most of my programs back then went something like this...

Code:
10 PRINT "[i]INSERT NAME OF SIBLING HERE[/i]"
20 GOTO 10
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Post: #2
Hm. That would have been Charles Babbage's Difference Engine. It was 1822, so I would have been -149 years old. Sadly, there weren't any games for it...not even Code of Hammurabi.

In my next incarnation, I got a Commodore 64 at the age of 11. My father spent half the night trying to figure out how to program it. I spent the other half playing Congo Bongo. Later on, I got a Koala Pad for it and then all hell broke loose...

"Yes, well, that's the sort of blinkered, Philistine pig-ignorance I've come to expect from you non-creative garbage."
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Max
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Post: #3
My first computer was a Commodore 64... good old floppies. LOL I had like 200 games, most of them never worked. And I also had Mac OS for Commodore 64! Yes, it's true! There was a Mac OS for Commodore 64, with a mouse! It took me a long time before I realize I had to double-click the files to open them... Rasp

Freelance video game artist and video game compliance tester at Enzyme Testing Labs.
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Post: #4
At the age of 10 I got an LC475. Until I got my current computer, the computer I would have would always be just old enough to not do what I wanted it to do... Sad (luckily it's all changed now Smile)
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Sage
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Post: #5
I have no idea what it was called, but it was just some old PC I got when I was 10. Used the 5.25" floppies. That was a fun little machine.
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Luminary
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Post: #6
My parents got a Mac SE 20 when I was 10, and about a year later when it became clear that computers weren't just some passing fad for me, they bought a second hand Mac Classic with an external hard disk drive to be mine alone.

I got my start in programming with HyperCard on that first SE 20... what's bad is that it was my only computer until 1997 :o
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Member
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Post: #7
First computer was a Tandy 1000: http://www.fortunecity.com/marina/reach/435/trs1000.htm

My mom bought it to write her Masters thesis on. Had 4 copies backed up as floppy disks weren't so reliable then Wink Not to mention that the file didn't fit on a single disk.

Then we had a 286 (given to us).

First mac was a Mac Plus on loan for a month to "experience how great macs were." Then we bought a Performa 5200CD (yes, the ultimate lemon of a mac).

Then an indigo iMac, and then my beloved first personally owned mac, a new iBook.
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Member
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Post: #8
The first computer I used was a friend's TRS-80. I immediately made an adventure-type game in it using basic - and a scrolling driving game. Then my folks bought an Apple ][+ and I fell in love with the thing. Geekiness has ensued ever since.
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Post: #9
My first computer was a hand-me-down Commodore 64 when I was 6. A few years later, my dad got a new computer and I comandeered his old Mac Plus.

My first exposure to programming was Just Enough Pascal when I was in third grade. It ran in a desk accessory and it gave you lessons along with code you'd copy-paste into your program. I didn't really follow what was going on but followed the tutorials and made their little Gridwalker game.

Fifth grade I got started on Hypercard on our classroom Mac. First stack was an animation of a skateboarder going up a 3/4 pipe, falling from the top and then splattering into mush. Good times.

Justin Ficarrotta
http://www.justinfic.com
"It is better to be The Man than to work for The Man." - Alexander Seropian
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Apprentice
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Joined: 2002.12
Post: #10
This will show my age.....

I got an Atari 800 in late 1979.

Went from that to an Atari 520ST, then a Mega ST, Mega STE, then TT030. Finally moved on to PC/Linux after the Atari TT030 and jumped to OS X about 3 years or so ago.

I also had a Spectre GCR emulator cart for my Mega ST and up that allowed me to run Mac software on my Atari. It even allowed the Atari floppy drive to read Mac diskettes.

I still have all my old Atari stuff except the 520ST and Mega ST.

belboz@cinci.rr.com
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Post: #11
TRS-80, I think it was a Model 2. It was one of the older grey models, not the newer white ones. Mine didn't even have the sticker on top in the corner. I think it was like 1982 or something. I guess I was probably 8 or 9 at the time. I actually managed to program in a moving star field from a magazine called Riptide. I'll never forget that moment, it blew my mind that it worked!
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Member
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Post: #12
Wow. Who didn't get a C64 here and learn to program on it? That was my first computer too and I learned BASIC and assembly on it. Sadly, it was my only computer until I traded up for the newly released Powerbook 520c (which tells you how long I had that C64 for).

The brains and fingers behind Malarkey Software (plus caretaker of the world's two brattiest felines).
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Post: #13
Max Wrote:And I also had Mac OS for Commodore 64! Yes, it's true! There was a Mac OS for Commodore 64, with a mouse! It took me a long time before I realize I had to double-click the files to open them... Rasp

Ah, good ol' GEOS.

The brains and fingers behind Malarkey Software (plus caretaker of the world's two brattiest felines).
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Max
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Post: #14
Malarkey Wrote:Ah, good ol' GEOS.
Yeah! GEOS! It was related to Mac OS, right? I'm sure the mouse was Apple's. I remember seeing the Apple logo.

Freelance video game artist and video game compliance tester at Enzyme Testing Labs.
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Member
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Post: #15
Ah I started out with a C64 when I was 8. Dad has just finished a spell teaching computing with punch cards in the RAAF and he knew they were going to be big. He wanted to make sure both his boys got the best chances. So we had a C64 with tape drive and a 7 pin epson dotmatrix printer. About 1.5 - 2 years later we got a 1541 5.25" floppy drive. Then about 4 years later I saved for an entire year and went half with my parents for an Amiga 500 with 1 MB RAM. Man.. brings back the memorys.

Ah yes Geos. Up until a last year it was still for sale at full price. You can still buy it for $25 or download it from their company web site. GEOS and GEOS application software produced by Geoworks (formerly Berkeley Softworks) but now available from
http://cmdrkey.com/cbm/geos/geos1.html

And for good old fun on the Amiga who could go past AMOS! I've still got the original boxes / manuals and disks. Come to think of it, I've still got all the original C64 stuff as well
Smile

Justin "LordFire" Baldock
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