How old were you when you got your first computer? What kind of computer?

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Post: #31
Yeah, I did LOGO in elementary school! Anyone remember trying to make the turtle zoom around infinitely? Hah!
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Post: #32
I was about 7 or 8, first computer was a secondhand IIfx from my parents... Long live the weed whacker!

-CarbonX
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Sage
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Post: #33
I made lots of fractals with logo in 1st year, recursion is fun!

Sir, e^iπ + 1 = 0, hence God exists; reply!
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Post: #34
I can't believe that nobody has mentioned the amazing BBC Model B http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/BBC_Micro. Although I guess it's a UK thing.

Slightly OT, but out of interest, did anyone else every read the magazine "Let's Compute" http://www.8bs.com/letscomputemag.htm. BBC/Amos/WG/etc. - all kinds of BASIC code, complete with GOTOs, and friendly cartoon characters called ROM and RAM (not forgetting Uncle REM!).

Ahh, nostalgia!

- Iain
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Post: #35
IBethune Wrote:I can't believe that nobody has mentioned the amazing BBC Model B http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/BBC_Micro. Although I guess it's a UK thing.

Slightly OT, but out of interest, did anyone else every read the magazine "Let's Compute" http://www.8bs.com/letscomputemag.htm. BBC/Amos/WG/etc. - all kinds of BASIC code, complete with GOTOs, and friendly cartoon characters called ROM and RAM (not forgetting Uncle REM!).

Ahh, nostalgia!

- Iain

Mainly because the Beeb Micro was a UK only thing that helped put the UK way behind the rest of the world in teaching computing.

It had a great set of interfaces for scientific work, but it forced the user to learn inneficient coding styles and the complete government focus (including terrible TV computing programs as it was backed by the BBC) that went on years after the BBC Micro was obsolete (ie about a year after it was released) meant that nobody in the UK learned about modern computing until Acorn lost the BBC deal some years later on. While the rest of the world was learning to code at machine level on Apple ][s or being introduced to the radical concept of the GUI and user friendliness, the UK was still forced to use a dodgy version of BASIC and trying to use word processors that were command line based.

Not to mention the BBC Micro being far more expensive than comparable home computers or even office computers, so yet again UK schools blew all their cash on something useless :/
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Post: #36
Wow, that is totally interesting. I've never heard about the BBC Micro before. When people eventually started replacing them, what would you estimate was the most popular, and around when?
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Post: #37
This is the UK. Some schools are probably still using them :/

BBC Micros were still being sold into the late 80s and 90s, despite being outclassed by everything out there. The ports and such on them made them excellent for setting up with robo kits, turtles or scientific recording gear, but as an introduction to modern computing, they definitely weren't.
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Post: #38
I was told of businesses still using BBC's as recently as a couple of years ago.

However, if the computer still runs and it does what is required of it then why replace it?
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Post: #39
Andrew Sage Wrote:I was told of businesses still using BBC's as recently as a couple of years ago.

However, if the computer still runs and it does what is required of it then why replace it?

That's true if it's just as efficient as getting a new computer. However, if you've got to train staff to use archaic methods and it would be faster to do the job on a modern computer then it's worth switching.

With some small businesses though, it's pretty marginal. If the computing tasks aren't particularly heavy they might get away with it. The main problem comes if the member of staff that knows how to work the old machine moves on and you have to train someone new to use command lines etc. It's also possible that due to the limits of their computer they're not using it for other areas of the business that might benefit from computerisation.
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Post: #40
Looking at the pictures, my first computer was probably an apple classic.

The first of which I knew the model was a LC 475

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DavidJJ
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Post: #41
The first one I owned must've been an Apple II back in the late 70s so that would've been when I was in my late teens. I also had a Tandy TRS80 Model 4 with two of the big 8" (?) floppy drives in it during the same time period. I worked on a big old punch-card Wang in grade 9 though. Oh, the power!
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Sage
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Post: #42
blobbo Wrote:Yeah, I did LOGO in elementary school! Anyone remember trying to make the turtle zoom around infinitely? Hah!

I was completely absorbed in a LOGO program in 3rd grade when the Challenger blew up. As in, the whole class was watching, except for me in the back at the Apple. I heard the whole class inhale and the teacher say something sharp, then I turned around and saw the explosion on the TV.

Ever since, I have an association between LOGO and the death of the American space program Cry
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Post: #43
Wow, our first computer was a G4 Cube, so we would have got it sometime around 2000 or 2001. I didn't start programming for a few years after that either, so I must have only been programming for a couple of years all-up.

I hadn't really thought about it before, but that seems like a really short period of time. Technology and programming have both become such an integral part of my life since we got that computer, it's weird to think that only five years ago I was a farm boy who didn't even have a TV :-/

EDIT: I am 17 now, so I would have been about 12 when we got the Cube.
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Marjock
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Post: #44
Hmm. I think it was a MacPlus but by the time I actually started using a computer it would have been an LCIII. I guess I first started coding on that, but that was just changing another program so the background was green and the words said rude things about my siblings, so it doesn't really count Rasp

I really first started coding when somebody introdouced me to Metal BASIC and that was on a G3 iMac.

-Mark
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hazelden
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Post: #45
My First Computer was an Atari 400 with the basic cartridge & cassette drive.

Later I got a Vic-20.

Then I moved up to a 512K Mac with 2 external 3.5” floppy drives. I so wanted the external 1200 baud modem and red ryder modem software so I could use the many BBS in the area.

I got an Epson pc and used Turbo Pascal. It had a built in speech synthesis driver called “now speak”. It had a 2400 baud modem. Now that was fast 1 mb / hour downloads. Amazing ANSI graphics…

At this point in time I got an old Commodore 64 from my cousin and did hardware interfacing projects through the joystick ports. I even made my own water cistern tank monitoring software. Ahh… the joys of country living.

Then there was a Performa 580CD. It was my first multimedia experience.

I was really excited about 3d and the promise of PPC so I bought a cheap Power Computing Powerbase 180. I found Metal basic and fell in love with graphical programming. I had a love hate relationship with MPW and QD3D. I used Strata Vision 3D and Strata Studio Pro to make 3D models.

I moved up to a Power Macintosh 9600 with a Radius Video Vision PCI/ SP video hardware so I could do some serious
Video and multimedia. Electric Image 2.9 with modeler now that was cutting edge.

Years later I got a Mirror Door G4 and a Sony 24” CRT monitor.I felt guilty of abandoning my 9600… My first Mac OS X system! It even came with Project Builder. Maya 4.5 was just released and I wanted in.

On eBay I discovered a precious jem the Newton MessagePad 2100 something I had always wanted. Now I am learning to program the green brick. It has pretty good handwriting recognition. The device had some advanced Ideas a dynamic programming language and soups.
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