3D fundamentals and Educational ressources (looking for, not providing :-)

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Post: #1
I am at a very beginner level game programming but I'm eager to learn how. Especially about OpenGL and the mathematics (and implementation) behind creating a 3D game. Is there anyone who knows the industry and can give me a heads up as to how they began, and what amount of education I will need?

-Creating an efficient game loop
-3D model loading and animation
- OpenGl and physics
- OpenGl and motion

I am 20 years old and have always loved to play video games. I am intrigued by the depth of the industry. Math, Logic, art, music, design,storytelling.

I really have no idea how this stuff works so anything you could suggest would be good news to my ears.

Cool
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There is no need to start threads with "SEX!!!... ", that will just make people thing it is a spam post rather than a real one. I have deleted it for you.
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Sorry, should I repost?
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No, I removed it from the title so everything OK now.
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Tasnu Arakun
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Post: #5
Byron Clarke Wrote:I am at a very beginner level game programming but I'm eager to learn how. Especially about OpenGL and the mathematics (and implementation) behind creating a 3D game. Is there anyone who knows the industry and can give me a heads up as to how they began, and what amount of education I will need?

-Creating an efficient game loop
-3D model loading and animation
- OpenGl and physics
- OpenGl and motion

i'd say ten weeks of full time studies, and that's just getting into the theory bits of the things on your list. some things are easy, some hard - it's all a matter of how complicated things you which to do. the advices you'll get will most likely be something akin to: "go buy a book and d/l a few tutorials".
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Post: #6
Byron Clarke Wrote:I am at a very beginner level game programming but I'm eager to learn how. Especially about OpenGL and the mathematics (and implementation) behind creating a 3D game.

If you currently don't know anything about it, I would either proceed by learning how to do a mod for a game (for example, first learn how to make maps for an FPS game, and then you can learn how to make models, and scripts, etc... that will give you a really good idea how they work.)

Or your alternative is start with programming a simple 2D game. Do it in a simple scripting language like METAL basic or something and then when you finish that you can try to learn C++ and make a 2D game in that. Then you can move up to 3D.

You should not jump in and try to make a full-blown 3D game off the bat- you will most likely get frustrated and discouraged.

Education helps when you run into math or engineering you don't quite understand, but a large majority is just messing around and making really simple things until you build up to where you're trying to go.
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Jake Wrote:There is no need to start threads with "SEX!!!... ", that will just make people thing it is a spam post rather than a real one. I have deleted it for you.
Sex?! What?! Who?! Where?!?!?!?

Oh...more technical stuff... Sad

"Yes, well, that's the sort of blinkered, Philistine pig-ignorance I've come to expect from you non-creative garbage."
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Tasnu Arakun
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Post: #8
phydeaux Wrote:Or your alternative is start with programming a simple 2D game. Do it in a simple scripting language like METAL basic or something and then when you finish that you can try to learn C++ and make a 2D game in that. Then you can move up to 3D.


if there's any language you feel confident enough working with (that supports opengl) then making a simple 2d game in opengl might be a good way to start. plus you'll be able to make fairly complex things before you need to start optimizing your drawing code.
after that you can look into things like matrices and affine transformations. opengl can do some of these things for you, but sooner or later you'll need to know how they work. whether that implies studying linear algebra depends on just exactly how much you which to understand Wink
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Oldtimer
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Post: #9
Along the lines here - provided that you can handle a programming language to some degree, making simple games and graphics demos is the way to learn. I'd heartily recommend learning using SDL or OpenGL. There are a one advice that you should not listen to: people who tell you that the tools you're using aren't fast enough. SDL isn't blazing, and I wouldn't use it for a deployment product, but for learning, it's the stuff.

Then, you need to do tutorials. IMHO, doing stuff step by step, and then reading afterwards is the best way. If you want to try learning from books, godspeed. Just make sure you actually type in the code, not just reading it. Depending on where you start (OpenGL or SDL native drawing - go with OpenGL, man! Smile there are tutorials for you: http://nehe.gamedev.net http://www.gametutorials.com are good starts.

Then, stick around, ask questions, because that's what we're here for. Wink
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Oldtimer
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Post: #10
Ah, now I actually read your post. You said you wanted to get into 3D, and you know a bit of programming. Here goes:

Quote:- Creating an efficient game loop
-3D model loading and animation
- OpenGl and physics
- OpenGl and motion
1) Creating an efficient game loop isn't something you should worry about. Speed comes later, young grasshopper. That said, creating game loops is pretty much formalized, and if you browse/search this forum, you'll find the way.
2) 3D model loading, well... most of us here use the .obj format, some do .c4d, some do others. .obj is easy to parse, but it requires a bit of knowledge in file handling. Eventually, you'll realize that this is a no-brainer, but it won't seem like it the first few times.
3) OpenGL and physics... well, there are a couple of excellent physics API:s out there. Personally, I'd recommend Newton, but not until you feel confident in writing OpenGL applications.
4) OpenGL and motion - I take it you mean animation and model movement here. Just make sure you understand "time-based motion" and you'll be all set.

As for education... well, some people are going to kill me here, but I advocate the "make games, then go to school" line. Having made games will make programming and maths easier in school, not the other way around. Experimenting is the best way to learn new stuff, imho.
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Kaamoss
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Post: #11
Just to throw in my two cents here, it all depends on what you're most interested in. Assuming you're interested in the programming part, you should make humble begging’s. No offense to any previous posters but don't start coding in basic or something equally lame, it'll get you stuck with bad habits. I suggest learning java as your first programming language. Java code doesn’t execute as fast as C++ code because it's interpreted through the Java Virtual machine at run time but it gets you started with very good object oriented techniques and will give you a firm programming grasp. I would suggest the Deitel and Deitel book series as it is phenomenal. After you've got java down take the time to learn C and C++ maybe even objective c if you're into macs. Only after that would I delve into opengl. Otherwise, you won't understand the true beauty of the API and will become lost in it and feel overwhelmed. Sorry, but you really should start from the ground up if you're serious. If not, get a sams tech yourself C++ in 24 hours kind of deal and work with the quake 3 code doing some modifications.
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