Using Stuffit for games

Member
Posts: 148
Joined: 2003.03
Post: #1
I was just wondering what legal rights developers have to do the following:

Use stuffit to compress game data (textures, models, audio, etc.) and bundle the data as part of the game distribution. During runtime, the game uses Stuffit to then decompress and read the game data.

What I mean by "legal rights" is distribute the game as freeware, shareware, and perhaps commercially.
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Member
Posts: 57
Joined: 2002.04
Post: #2
If you don't need OS 9 compatibility, you're probably better off using the UNIX compression/decompression programs (gzip, gunzip, zip, unzip) since those come with the operating system and would probably work more transparently than Stuffit.
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Moderator
Posts: 365
Joined: 2002.04
Post: #3
Check out this. You need a license to use the StuffIt Engine with your program. I can't tell from their blurb whether they want you to pay for it - maybe they bill you according to how commercial you are.

Why don't you just use compressed image and audio formats? However, if you really want to keep everything in an archive, maybe you should look at something like zlib.

Neil Carter
Nether - Mac games and comic art
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Member
Posts: 100
Joined: 2006.05
Post: #4
Using Stuffit is probably not a good idea. Mostly because of compatibility issues. You may not know whether the user has the most recent version of Stuffit, but most importantly some newer versions of Stuffit can't open older formats. In fact, lately, Stuffit has been seriously screwing up my archives, so I'd go with the other suggested formats.
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Member
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Joined: 2002.08
Post: #5
Also, Stuffit (and gzip) is a general-purpose compressor. You can get much better compression by using different libraries designed for different tasks, like PNG or even JPEG graphics, or mp3 audio (expanded to AIFF or whatever on load).
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Member
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Post: #6
Careful, decompressing .mp3's costs you 75 cents for every copy of your game sold.

"Pay no attention to that man behind the curtain." - Wizard of Oz
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Member
Posts: 57
Joined: 2002.04
Post: #7
Not if you use QuickTime for the decompression; Apple's already payed the royalties for the QuickTime decoder.
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spaceb
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Post: #8
I got around paying for the stuffit engine license by using Binhex (.hqx) instead. The compression isn't quite as good as .sit, but there's free domain code on the web for compressing/decompressing binhex files.
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Moderator
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Joined: 2002.04
Post: #9
Binhex isn't supposed to be used as a compression format! It does perform some simple run-length compression, but it's primary purpose is as an encoding format for passing 8 bit data through a 7 bit medium. It has a diabolical compression ratio, and it'll probably make the data bigger if it's already compressed!

Neil Carter
Nether - Mac games and comic art
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Member
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Post: #10
Quote:Originally posted by Mazilurik
Not if you use QuickTime for the decompression;


That's cool, but I can't count on Windows and Linux people to have Quicktime.

I'll always cater to the Mac crowd first, but someday I'd like to make a little money from this hobby. Wink

Still, it's good to know that I could add in MP3 support for those with Quicktime, if the need comes around.

I just use SDL_Mixer and Ogg Vorbis. No license fees.

Aaron

"Pay no attention to that man behind the curtain." - Wizard of Oz
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Brad Oliver
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Post: #11
Quote:Originally posted by NCarter
However, if you really want to keep everything in an archive, maybe you should look at something like zlib.

I'd like to second that. You can use zlib and things will be just fine. For example, Quake 3 pk3 files (they contain all the non-executable assets) are simply zip files with a different extension. zlib is a painless API to work with.
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ClarustheDogCow
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Post: #12
Quote:Originally posted by Brad Oliver
I'd like to second that. You can use zlib and things will be just fine. For example, Quake 3 pk3 files (they contain all the non-executable assets) are simply zip files with a different extension. zlib is a painless API to work with.


I'm not even sure if pak3 files have compression...
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Member
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Joined: 2006.05
Post: #13
Pak3 does have compression. Try dragging a .pk3 file into Stuffit. A 3.4MB .pk3 file is about 6.4MB when uncompressed.
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Nibbie
Posts: 0
Joined: 2011.01
Post: #14
One thing you might want to look into is PhysicsFS ( http://www.icculus.org/physfs/ ), which allows you to store the files and such in one big file like quake, and have compression on the file... better yet, just go to the homepage and read the explanation there, it's much better than my ramblings.
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