working with Windows team members for iOS dev

Nibbie
Posts: 4
Joined: 2011.01
Post: #1
Hey all,

I'm the only one in our team with a Mac, but we all have iPhone devices and are signed up to the dev program. We're going through all the pains of our first project together, but are eager to see results. (insert good luck charms here. Wink )

As you might imagine, I'm currently the largest bottleneck in our process since I have to pull down the updates from SVN and build on my machine, then send the other guys any problems with the updated code....including annoying things like syntax errors.

Is there any way that we can at least *compile* iOS objective C on Windows somehow? (or via a Linux VM, etc)? To keep everyone reasonably productive and reduce any syntax errors during compilation?

We're looking for something other than jailbreaking or hackintoshing.

Once we (hopefully) see a bit of income, we'll be able to spring for extra Macs for development, but we're hoping to find an interim solution.

thanks!
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Moderator
Posts: 438
Joined: 2003.08
Post: #2
Is your machine always available? Could they remote into it and pull down/build on your machine and such? It's not too much better than what you're doing now, but at least they can do it whenever they want.
Also, how big is your team? How spread out are they?
Alex
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Moderator
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Post: #3
(Jan 11, 2011 09:41 AM)wazoo Wrote:  As you might imagine, I'm currently the largest bottleneck in our process since I have to pull down the updates from SVN and build on my machine, then send the other guys any problems with the updated code....including annoying things like syntax errors.

You mean fix the code and do an svn commit, right? For some reason, from the way this is phrased, I'm picturing you sending them an e-mail with code snippets and changes highlighted, and letting them put it in on their end while still being unable to compile and test it. Hopefully I'm just reading this wrong, but I guess I don't know the full extent of your process.

My normal approach to this would be to keep your iOS/ObjC code cleanly separated from the rest of your application's logic, have the Windows programmers work only on the non-iOS parts and maintain a way to compile and run on Windows, and have the people on your team with Macs (just you in this case) solely maintain the iOS glue. Depending on the sort of app you're writing, this might not be feasible, but for any OpenGL game you should be able to get away with the vast majority of your game avoiding system APIs entirely, keeping the portion you'd have to maintain very small.
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Nibbie
Posts: 4
Joined: 2011.01
Post: #4
(Jan 11, 2011 10:57 AM)EvolPenguin Wrote:  Is your machine always available? Could they remote into it and pull down/build on your machine and such? It's not too much better than what you're doing now, but at least they can do it whenever they want.
Also, how big is your team? How spread out are they?
Alex

Thanks Alex!

We're all local in the same city, just routinely away from each other on "day job" type of activities.

The only thing stable and available 99.9% of the time is the SVN repo. My Mac is usually with me so something like RDP to it is not going to work too well.



(Jan 11, 2011 11:07 AM)ThemsAllTook Wrote:  You mean fix the code and do an svn commit, right? For some reason, from the way this is phrased, I'm picturing you sending them an e-mail with code snippets and changes highlighted, and letting them put it in on their end while still being unable to compile and test it.

Depends on the error but you're mostly correct. If it's something easy I can fix (like a missing semi-colon or whatever), then naturally I'll do it.

We'll get better over time as we work with ObjC more, but I don't want to have to make some of these changes...(otherwise I may as well do the entire coding on my own).

Quote: have the Windows programmers work only on the non-iOS parts and maintain a way to compile and run on Windows

This is where I need the help pretty please! We have things separated out as much as we can (for our first title on iPhone) which again we'll hopefully improve over time as we code.....*cross fingers*

I've come across CYGWIN with GCC...is this an option available for compiling against the iOS SDK?
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Luminary
Posts: 5,143
Joined: 2002.04
Post: #5
Just write a Windows version of your game with desktop OpenGL, OpenAL and C++, and "maintain a port to OpenGL ES2 and iOS" as a conceptually separate activity.

Trying to develop with ObjC for iOS directly without having Macs is crazy, particularly for a game, where it doesn't matter.
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Nibbie
Posts: 4
Joined: 2011.01
Post: #6
alright, thanks @OneSadCookie (and everyone). It was worth a shot.

have a great day all,
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Moderator
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Post: #7
(Jan 11, 2011 11:19 AM)wazoo Wrote:  I've come across CYGWIN with GCC...is this an option available for compiling against the iOS SDK?

No. You can compile Obj-C using GCC on windows, but without linking to the iOS frameworks, I can't imagine what use that'd be.

Also, I've had great luck lately with MinGW on Windows with GCC. I haven't tried cygwin, but it *seems* like most folks recommend MinGW. Doesn't matter though, as I doubt this route is what you're looking for.

In addition to the other suggestions from others, I'd look into using an OpenGL ES simulator for Windows as well.

There was a thread here somewhat recently where a couple of guys mentioned they're doing something similar by doing most of their dev on Windows, so it might be worth digging through the forum a bit to find that thread.
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Nibbie
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Joined: 2011.01
Post: #8
(Jan 11, 2011 04:33 PM)AnotherJake Wrote:  Also, I've had great luck lately with MinGW on Windows with GCC. I haven't tried cygwin, but it *seems* like most folks recommend MinGW. Doesn't matter though, as I doubt this route is what you're looking for.

In addition to the other suggestions from others, I'd look into using an OpenGL ES simulator for Windows as well.

There was a thread here somewhat recently where a couple of guys mentioned they're doing something similar by doing most of their dev on Windows, so it might be worth digging through the forum a bit to find that thread.

Oh nice..thanks for that advice! I'll hunt it down and see what I can find.
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